The 3rd annual Virginia Inclusion Summit took place on November 16, 2021.

About the Virginia Inclusion Summit

The Virginia Inclusion Summit brings together workplace professionals, government employees, and higher education administrators and students for a day of learning, sharing, and connecting. The program includes a dynamic keynote speaker and interactive breakout sessions. Attendees have the opportunity to explore current events and learn about best practices to help institutions across Virginia become more equitable and inclusive.

This year, the Virginia Inclusion Summit presents our workshops in themes. HEAD workshops will be knowledge builders, HEART workshops will focus on internal work and relationships, and HAND workshop will share tangible actions based on best practices.  Additionally, the Summit will include VCIC SPOTLIGHT workshops, which are an opportunity to experience the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities’ award-winning professional development.

8:30am – 9:35am

  • Welcome
  • Opening Plenary Workshop
    Facilitated by the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities
9:50am – 11:05am
  • Workshop Session 1  (Choose 1 workshop)
    • HEAD: Understanding Inclusive Facilitation Skills
    • HEART: Leveraging ERGs to Foster Belonging
    • HAND: From Statement to Action: Lessons from DEI Work Since 2020
    • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Introduction to Intersectionality 
11:20am – 12:35pm
  • Workshop Session 2  (Choose 1 workshop)
    • HEAD: Developing & Implementing Your DEI Strategy
    • HEART: Community Engagement & Wellness as DEI Strategies
    • HAND: White People as Allies: Avoiding a Savior Complex
    • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Preventing and Responding to Microaggressions

12:35pm – 1:30pm

  • Lunch Break
1:30pm – 2:45pm
  • Workshop Session 3  (Choose 1 workshop)
    • HEAD: Making Equity Visible Through Inclusive Hiring
    • HEART: Courageous Conversations: Learning and Growth
    • HAND: Advancing Racial Equity in the Workplace
    • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Unconscious Bias 201
3:00pm – 4:00 pm
  • Closing Keynote Address: “Belonging is Critical to Success” | Sponsored by CarMax
    Presented by Dr. Terrell Strayhorn

Click on the time for more information

Opening Session

  • Welcome
    • Dr. Janice Underwood, Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer, Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Opening Plenary Workshop
    Chris Burton, Vice President of Programs, Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities
    Jonathan C. Zur, President & CEO, Virginia Center for Inclusion Communities

    • The Opening Session of the 2021 Virginia Inclusion Summit will provide an opportunity to frame the day-long program, begin to build community, and introduce key topics connected to diversity, equity, and inclusion. In particular, participants will co-create norms for learning and engagement at the Summit. They will also have the chance to meet fellow participants through a structured introduction exercise. The Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities will share an overarching framework connected to using an equity lens that participants will be encouraged to utilize throughout the summit and in their ongoing professional work.

Workshop Session 1  (Choice between 4 workshops)

  • HEAD: Understanding Inclusive Facilitation Skills
    Charm Bullard

This interactive training will share some of the frameworks and principles that inform effective program facilitation.  Participants will consider the role of the facilitator and how to sequence questions and activities to support engagement.  They will also reflect on group dynamics and the impact of identity.  Through this program, participants will clearly understand how a facilitator’s role evolves as a group develops and they will proactively identify responses to common challenges.

 

  • HEART: Leveraging ERGs to Foster Belonging
    Quan Tiet Schneider 

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) give employees with shared identities and experiences a safe space, a voice to be heard and valued, and a sense of belonging. ERGs and their members are instrumental in the culture of an organization. They provide insights and ideas on business, organizational strategies, and programming to support  and develop needs of their members and beyond. Hear from an inclusion, diversity and equity manager about her company’s journey, learning, and perspectives on what it takes to leverage ERGs to foster belonging.

 

  • HAND: From Statement to Action: Lessons from DEI Work Since 2020
    Moderator: Chris Burton; Panelists: Denise Counce, Tina Garrett-Ragland, Dr. Fanchon Glover, Mel Smith Jr. 

Many of us would have never imagined that 2020 would give us a global pandemic and bring into public discourse complex issues around race, class, and justice in the United States. Indeed, 2020 happened, and the year was full of lessons about understanding race in the United States, with a particular focus on social inequity and why and how it exists. The year left us wondering what we could and should be doing to help support diversity, inclusion, equity, and justice. This panel discussion will bring together a group of DEI thought leaders to share their insights and perspectives about 2020 and ideas for moving forward.

 

  • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Introduction to Intersectionality
    Jacqueline “Jacquie” Johnson 

Intersectionality recognizes each person’s multiplicity of identities and the links within and across identities. Through a deeper understanding of intersectionality, individuals can better understand bias and more effectively build pathways to inclusion. This workshop will help participants explore the concept of intersectionality and apply this framework to both their professional work and personal lives.

Workshop Session 2  (Choice between 4 workshops)

  • HEAD: Developing & Implementing Your DEI Strategy
    George P. Braxton

Many organizations are recognizing that a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is not only the right thing to do but that it is imperative for organizational improvement and sustainability. Unfortunately, without an organization-wide, leadership-supported plan, DEI can be forced into a separate silo and not become a part of the entity’s culture or goals.

 

  • HEART: Community Engagement & Wellness as DEI Strategies
    Mekbib Gemeda

Slavery, Jim Crow, red lining, separate and unequal education, and mass incarceration have shaped the current inequities and produced disparities in all facets of American life, from education to employment, housing, and health. The murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and Ahmaud Arbery have generated another cycle of anguish and outrage about the continuing trail of injustice and suffering in the United States. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic has affected African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Peoples at a higher rate than other groups. These events magnify the underlying inequities in health outcomes and access to care as well as the urgency to address equity and inclusion. This workshop will focus on how to integrate community engagement and wellness as core elements in shaping DEI work.

 

  • HAND: White People as Allies: Avoiding a Savior Complex
    Jessica M. Hawthorne, Emma Yackso 

White individuals in America are often deeply motivated to address social inequities and fight for racial justice. However, many of the tools we’ve been taught for doing this work open the door to a savior complex. In this workshop, participants will learn about white saviorism, consider how to spot it in their own work, and develop tools and strategies to engage in social justice-oriented work as a true ally to those directly impacted.

 

  • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Preventing and Responding to Microaggressions
    Alejandro Prince  

Microaggressions have been defined as “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities.” While they may not result in formal complaints or lawsuits, they do have consequences when it comes to morale, engagement, and retention. This session will explore the concept of microaggressions and will help participants identify effective strategies to prevent and interrupt these indignities when they arise in the workplace.

Break | Lunch

Take some time for yourself to refresh.

Workshop Session 3  (Choice between 4 workshops)

  • HEAD: Making Equity Visible Through Inclusive Hiring
    ReNee’ S. Dunman, Dr. Veleka Gatling 

Many organizations state they are committed to building inclusive and equitable work environments where employees from all backgrounds feel supported and valued. Inclusive hiring is a key piece of the employee experience and can lead to higher employee retention, improved morale, and higher productivity. This session invites participants to embrace the philosophy that this commitment must begin before an employee is hired and will help to reimagine recruitment and hiring practices through a lens of inclusivity.

 

  • HEART: Courageous Conversations: Learning and Growing
    Dr. Robert L. Canida, II

This an engaging workshop on how to have dialogue about uncomfortable but necessary topics. Courageous Conversations are opportunities where individuals can leave with a better understanding of self and those who are seen as different. During the workshop, participants will focus on building competencies that are necessary in engaging in difficult conversations, all while maintaining strong workplace relationships.

 

  • HAND: Advancing Racial Equity in the Workplace
    May Nivar, Vivian Oden

Do you work for a racially equitable organization? How can you tell if you do? Come join this session to learn more about the tips, tools and strategies on how to assess and advance racial equity in your workplace.

 

  • VCIC SPOTLIGHT: Unconscious Bias 201
    Tally Botzer  

Once individuals learn about unconscious bias, their next question is often “what do I do with this information?” This interactive workshop will provide deeper research on the science behind unconscious bias to help participants better understand when and how it is showing up. They will also learn about best practices to address unconscious bias, both as individuals and on behalf of their organizations.

CarMax Keynote

Belonging is Critical to Success
Dr. Terrell Strayhorn

Many researchers have named that belonging is critical to success. In this keynote presentation, participants will have the opportunity to hear from a scholar and academic who leads research on belonging and its importance in workplace and educational settings. Dr. Terrell Strayhorn will share best practices and research on creating a sense of belonging in institutions. As research shows, when employees feel that they belong in the workplace, it often leads to lower rates of turnover and higher job satisfaction in a more inclusive environment. Following the keynote lecture, Dr. Strayhorn will take questions from the audience.

Click on the program to open in full screen (esc to return to this page)

“Belonging is Critical to Success”

Dr. Terrell Strayhorn is Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Professor of Urban Education in the Evelyn Reid Syphax School of Education at Virginia Union University, where he also serves as Director of the Center for the Study of HBCUs. An internationally-recognized equity expert, Strayhorn’s research focuses on the social psychological determinants of success for minoritized and other vulnerable populations. His pioneering research on sense of belonging has informed state policies, transformed campus/school and workplace practices, STEM contexts, and led to successful intervention testing. Strayhorn is a highly-cited scholar, Associate Editor of Social Sciences & Humanities, Specialty Chief Editor of Frontiers in Education, and author of 11 books and over 150 journal articles and reports. A member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated, Strayhorn is a faculty affiliate at Rutgers University’s Center for MSIs, Fellow of the Association of Governing Boards Leadership Institute, Member of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Freedom Schools Research Advisory Committee, and several other research institutes. He has been named one of the country’s top diversity and inclusion scholars by Diverse Issues, “Top 20 to Know in Education,” and “Top 40 under 40,” by BusinessFirst, to name a few awards.

Tally Botzer is Director of Educational Programs at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In her role, Tally facilitates educational programs on diversity and inclusion for schools across the Commonwealth.

With over a decade of nonprofit experience, Tally has worked in formal and informal education in Richmond since 2013. Most recently, Tally managed youth and family programs at the American Civil War Museum, where she designed programs primarily for students and educators on diverse topics, including the complicated roots and legacies of race and racism in the United States. She has presented at local and national conferences for educators on topics including teaching difficult subject matter and countering historical bias.

Tally received her Bachelor’s degree in English with a concentration in writing and her Master of Education in Elementary Education, both from the University of Mary Washington.

George P. Braxton is the Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer for Virginia’s Department of Wildlife Resources. Prior to joining DWR, he was the chief diversity officer at the Defense Contract Management Agency and director of recruiting and diversity at the LeClair Ryan law firm. George’s has worked in higher education as the Associate Director of Admissions at Georgetown University Law Center, Dean of Admissions at The Catholic University of America, Columbus School Law, and Diversity Coordinator and Assistant Professor at Old Dominion University.

He is a graduate of the University of Maryland-College Park and the University of Virginia School of Law.

Currently, George lives in Richmond, VA where he serves on the board of directors of the Greater Richmond Transit Company and the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities-Richmond Chapter.

Charm Bullard is Senior Advisor to the CEO at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In her role, she designs and facilitates educational programs on diversity, equity, and inclusion for institutions across Virginia. Since joining the VCIC team in 2016, Charm has had the opportunity to conduct over 400 workshops across the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Prior to joining VCIC, Charm spent 11 years working in various student affairs roles on collegiate campuses throughout the Southeast. One accomplishment she is particularly proud of is founding the Connecting Women of Color Conference at the University of Richmond, which was featured in Women in Higher Education and Essence magazines.

Charm received her Bachelor’s degree in English from Lander University and her Master’s degree in Education with an emphasis on College Student Affairs Administration from the University of Georgia.

Chris Burton is Vice President of Programs at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In his role, he designs and facilitates educational programs on diversity, equity, and inclusion for institutions across Virginia. Chris particularly specializes in VCIC’s workplace and community programs.

Chris previously taught English and Special Education in both public and independent school settings. He serves as an ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America as well as an Inaugural Social Justice Fellow for The Memorial Foundation. He is also an avid podcaster and co-hosts a podcast about race, culture, and soul care called CrossStreets.

Chris is an alumnus of Davidson College, received his Master of Divinity from Union Presbyterian Seminary, Master of Science in Education from St. John’s University, and is currently at Union as a Doctor of Ministry Candidate.

Dr. Robert L. Canida, II is the Vice President for Inclusive Excellence at the University of Lynchburg, Lynchburg VA. Dr. Canida is a seasoned “angelic troublemaker” professional with over 25 years in higher education. Before coming to Lynchburg, Canida spent two decades serving the University of North Carolina System’s most diverse campus, UNC-Pembroke.

He has numerous publications on the subject of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Dr. Canida is also the CEO of the CANOX Consulting Group, LLC. His two favorite and purpose-filled quotes are from Audre Lorde and Malala Yousafzai.

“It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.” – Audrey Lorde

“I raise my voice, not to shout, but so that those without a voice can be heard!” – Malala Yousafzai

Denise Counce is Senior Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion Officer at TowneBank. With a focus on preserving, protecting, and nurturing one of TowneBank’s founding principles, to create a warm sense of belonging for everyone, Denise works passionately to ensure all employees and members feel valued and respected by forging alliances through relationships and partnerships.

Denise has been with TowneBank for over 17 years. She is a graduate of Strayer University and TowneBank’s Management Associate Program. Additionally, she graduated from The Virginia Banker’s School of Bank Management and completed a Diversity and Inclusion Certification with eCornell, Cornell University’s online learning platform.

Active in the community, Denise serves on the following boards: Menchville House Ministries (Immediate Past Chair); Southeastern Virginia Health System (Treasurer); Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (Peninsula Chapter Member); and People to People (Board Member).

ReNee’ S. Dunman was awarded Emerita status after retiring from over 25 years of service to Old Dominion University. During her tenure as Assistant Vice President for Equity and Diversity, Old Dominion received national and local awards.

As a subject matter expert on equal opportunity and diversity issues, ReNee’ has been interviewed by CNN, BBC, Court TV, Time Magazine, Atlanta Life, and Diverse Issues. She has advised the Norwegian government on affirmative action, and numerous U.S. legislators on EEO and higher education legislation. During the Obama Administration, she was invited to the White House twice to discuss her work.

ReNee’ is a member of the Virginia State Bar and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She served two terms on the State Board of Directors for the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities and currently serves on the Hampton Roads UNCF Committee to raise funds for deserving students.

Tina Garrett-Ragland has over 20 year’s experience as a global and domestic Human Resources Executive and is currently serving as the Enterprise Leader of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion and Learning and Development for Pacific Life Insurance. Her greatest joy comes from supporting the growth and development of leaders, people, and organizations.

Tina is a Certified Professional Coach, Trainer, and Speaker. Tina serves on several boards including, the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities Lynchburg Chapter, Miriam House, and Girls on the Run. She holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business, a Master of Business Administration and is currently pursuing her PhD in Global Leadership and Change.

Dr. Veleka Gatling has committed her life to seeking opportunities for educators and community members to achieve excellence in their fields of expertise, while promoting visible equity. With over 27 years in public education, Dr. Gatling has served as a teacher, assistant principal, principal, executive director of special and gifted programs, and executive director of professional learning in various school divisions in Hampton Roads Region of Virginia. She has also served as an adjunct professor in the department of educational leadership at Old Dominion University.

Dr. Gatling has provided keynotes and breakout sessions at state and national conferences on topics related to facilitating better conversations to promote visible equity. Dr. Gatling is a Qualified Assessor of the Intercultural Development Inventory*. She is also a Certified Trainer of Bold, Inclusive Conversations for public, private and non-profit organizations.

Mekbib Gemeda serves as Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS). Since joining EVMS in this inaugural role, Mekbib has implemented strategies that have enhanced inclusion training and doubled matriculation of underrepresented groups into the medical program.

Prior to joining EVMS, Mekbib served as the Assistant Dean for Diversity Affairs and Community Health and founding Director of the Center for the Health of the African Diaspora at New York University School of Medicine.

Mekbib’s efforts to advance equity nationally include serving on the steering committee of the Group on Diversity and Inclusion of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). He is the inaugural chair of the Health Professions Chapter of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE) and serves on the State Board of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities.

Dr. Fanchon Glover serves as the founding Chief Diversity Officer at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. She serves on the President’s Executive Leadership Team and provides strategic leadership on campus and in the community that advances university initiatives to foster inclusion, equity, and excellence. She is also an Executive Faculty member in the William & Mary School of Education. Her research interests include leadership, diversity in higher education, women’s leadership, and cultural competency training.

Dr. Glover earned her Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Presbyterian College (SC) and a Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Higher Education Administration from the College of William & Mary. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. (Williamsburg Alumnae Chapter); Newport News Chapter of The Links, Inc., YJCW NAACP (Scholarship Committee); Former Board member for Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership Honor Society; and All-Together Board of Directors.

Jessica M. Hawthorne is Vice President of Programs at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). Jessica particularly specializes in VCIC’s programs for K-12 schools and higher education. She also leads VCIC’s program evaluation efforts.

In the community, Jessica has served on the faculty of the Koinonia School for Race and Justice at Richmond Hill, and she was a member of both the Juvenile Justice Collaborative Youth Violence Prevention Workgroup and the Trauma-Informed Community Network. Jessica was also a community facilitator for the Unpacking the Census program.

Jessica received her undergraduate degree from the University of Virginia in Religious Studies, concentrating in African Religions and Islam. Jessica also earned a Master of Theological Studies from the Candler School of Theology at Emory University along with a Certificate in Religious Education.

Jacqueline “Jacquie” Johnson is Director of Professional Development at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In her role, she designs, coordinates, delivers and evaluates diversity, equity, and inclusion programs conducted for VCIC’s workplace clients across Virginia.

Jacquie has a diverse background that includes workplace diversity, equity, inclusion (DEI) strategy, instructional design, and underrepresented community outreach and engagement. She is especially interested in how DEI practices, adult learning, and inner self-work build and better workplaces and the broader community for everyone to thrive. Jacquie currently serves on the board of The Fund for Leadership, Equity, Access, and Diversity (The LEAD Fund).

Jacquie received her Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from Old Dominion University and her Master’s degree in Anthropology from George Washington University.

May Nivar likes to solve problems, build bridges, and mobilize and influence others behind issues and solutions, particularly on ways to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace and in the community. On behalf of Altria, May is a Fellow with CEO Action for Racial Equity, the first business-led coalition of its kind focused on improving the lives of Black Americans through advocacy. May was also the founding chair of Altria’s Asian employee resource group. She is the founding chair of the Asian & Latino Solidarity Alliance and a Richmond Chapter member of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities. Until recently, May was a gubernatorial appointee and chair of the Virginia Asian Advisory Board.

May holds a BA in Journalism and Mass Communications from New York University and is a 2017 graduate of Leadership Metro Richmond’s Quest program.

Vivian Oden is the vice president for equity and inclusion at the Hampton Roads Community Foundation where she leads the foundation in its racial equity work. She has facilitated conversations on race, unconscious bias, stereotypes and racial equity. As an expert in philanthropy, Vivian sees the importance of engaging diverse voices and building long-lasting relationships.

Vivian serves on the state board of directors for Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities and is the president-elect for the Hampton Roads Diversity & Inclusion Consortiums board of directors. She earned an undergraduate degree in business administration and a master’s degree in public administration with a concentration in nonprofit management from Old Dominion University, and a certificate in nonprofit management from the Academy for Nonprofit Excellence. She is also a graduate of Initiatives of Change’s Community Trustbuilding Fellowship.

Alejandro Prince is an Educational Programs Coordinator at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In his role, Alejandro designs, coordinates, and facilitates programs, events, and conferences on diversity, equity, and inclusion primarily for educators and students across the Commonwealth.

Prior to joining VCIC, Alejandro worked with a Community Action Agency delivering programs centered on violence prevention, trauma-informed education, healthy relationships, and college and career readiness for youth. His research and experience with curricula development center on the connections of moral philosophy, racial justice, gender & sexuality, history, and psychology.

In the community, Alejandro serves on the Governing Body of the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biblical Studies from Azusa Pacific University and his Master’s in Theological Studies with a Certificate in African American and Diaspora Studies from Vanderbilt University.

Quan Tiet Schneider is on the Inclusion, Diversity & Equity team at Altria. Her core role focuses on maximizing the contributions of the Employee Resource Groups (and other employee groups) at Altria to support the company’s vision and goals. During her 23-year tenure, she has led teams and worked in Altria’s Sales & Marketing team and trained new hires while on the Learning & Development team. Quan is a graduate of the University of Virginia.

Quan has been affiliated with the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities since 1993, when she participated as a delegate in the high school program “Metrotown.” She has served on the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities’ State Board of Directors since 2016. Quan was recently appointed to the Virginia Asian Advisory Board which advises the Governor on issues impacting the AAPI Community in Virginia.

Mel Smith Jr. serves as Director for Diversity and Inclusion at Genworth. As Genworth’s chief diversity officer, Mel leads and coordinates efforts to create and sustain a diverse, inclusive, and welcoming environment for all Genworth employees including consultants, suppliers, and customers.

Mel’s goal is to make diversity and inclusion Genworth’s way of doing business. His vision is to advance a culture of belonging where open hearts and minds combine to unleash the potential of the brilliant mix of people in every corner of Genworth.  He has launched a major “Respect in the Workplace” initiative aimed to arm every employee with the proper tools and information to become a diverse and inclusive community. Mel has also made recruitment, which was once a dotted line, a major component of his strategy.

Mel serves on the State Board of Directors for the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities.

Dr. Terrell Strayhorn is Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Professor of Urban Education in the Evelyn Reid Syphax School of Education at Virginia Union University, where he also serves as Director of the Center for the Study of HBCUs. An internationally-recognized equity expert, Strayhorn’s research focuses on the social psychological determinants of success for minoritized and other vulnerable populations. His pioneering research on sense of belonging has informed state policies, transformed campus/school and workplace practices, STEM contexts, and led to successful intervention testing. Strayhorn is a highly-cited scholar, Associate Editor of Social Sciences & Humanities, Specialty Chief Editor of Frontiers in Education, and author of 11 books and over 150 journal articles and reports. A member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated, Strayhorn is a faculty affiliate at Rutgers University’s Center for MSIs, Fellow of the Association of Governing Boards Leadership Institute, Member of the Children’s Defense Fund’s Freedom Schools Research Advisory Committee, and several other research institutes. He has been named one of the country’s top diversity and inclusion scholars by Diverse Issues, “Top 20 to Know in Education,” and “Top 40 under 40,” by BusinessFirst, to name a few awards.

Emma Yackso is Community Programs Coordinator at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC). In her role, she designs, coordinates, delivers, and evaluates diversity, equity, and inclusion programs for non-profit organizations, community groups, and government agencies across the Commonwealth.

Emma comes to VCIC with a strong background in justice-oriented work, including a decade of experience in LGBTQ+ advocacy and support, community organizing, and southern-focused racial equity work. Most recently the Director of Programs at Side by Side, Emma is a clinical social worker who has worked in communities in Washington, D.C., New Orleans, LA, and Richmond and Charlottesville, VA.

Emma received her Masters of Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University, and she is a licensed clinical social worker in the state of Virginia. She earned her undergraduate degree from George Washington University.

Jonathan C. Zur is President & CEO of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC).  Under Jonathan’s leadership, VCIC has more than tripled the size of the budget and staff, and the number of programs delivered annually has increased by 3,000%. Additionally, the organization has been recognized locally and nationally for its effectiveness.

An experienced facilitator and consultant on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion, Jonathan was appointed by the Governor of Virginia to the Commonwealth Commission on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, formed in the aftermath of the tragedy in Charlottesville in August 2017. In 2016, Jonathan was a speaker at the inaugural White House Summit on Diversity and Inclusion in Government.

Jonathan earned his B.A. from the University of Richmond and he received a Certificate in Nonprofit Executive Leadership from the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.

Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDC) for SHRM-CP® or SHRM-SCP® recertification activities.

 

The use of the official seal confirms that this Program has met HR Certification Institute’s (HRCI) criteria for re-certification credit pre-approval.

 

 

 

Details about HRCI and SHRM credits will be provided at the event.

The 2021 conference will be held virtually. To register, please click here or just scroll down.

Registrants will receive information by email on how to connect to the summit prior to November 16. Please keep an eye on your inbox for an email from support@exposent.com for your link to access the conference.

Thank you to the 2021 Virginia Inclusion Summit Sponsors

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